National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM)

NASEM Comment Deadline: International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) and the Royal Society have convened an international commission to develop a framework for considering technical, scientific, medical, regulatory, and ethical requirements for human germline genome editing, should society conclude such applications are acceptable.

To inform its deliberations, the Commission is engaging with external expertise and invites public comments. The call for evidence includes several questions that invite broad input; others are more technical in nature. It is being distributed to researchers and professional societies for genetic technologies and reproductive medicine, bioethics forums, patient community organizations, and others. Interested members of the public are also encouraged to participate.

Members of the public may submit comments online. More information is available at this Royal Society website.

NASEM Workshop: Brain Health Across the Lifespan

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, will hold a workshop titled "Brain Health Across the Lifespan." The workshop will explore issues related to brain health throughout the life span, from birth through old age. Workshop presentations will explore the following questions:

  • What are accepted definitions of brain health and resilience?
  • What are the key elements to measure status of brain health and its resilience across the life span?
  • What additional research questions can be addressed to increase our understanding of brain plasticity throughout the life span?

Members of the public may attend in person with advance registration. More information is available at this NASEM website.

After ‘CRISPR babies,’ international medical leaders aim to tighten genome editing guidelines

STAT – Less than two years after producing an exhaustive report on human genome editing, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences are planning an international commission on the most controversial use of that technology — creating “CRISPR babies". 

Draw clearer red lines around human gene editing, say leaders of Chinese and U.S. science academies

Science – The world urgently needs better international oversight of “genome editing in human embryos for reproductive purposes,” says an editorial co-written by the heads of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in Beijing, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine (NAM), which are both in Washington, D.C.